AAA2020 Virtual Conference Banner 7 - 10 Dec

Day 1 – Monday 7 December 2020

Click on the presentation to view the abstract.

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9:40am – 10:00am

NSW, VIC, TAS, ACT

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9:10am – 9:30am

SA

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8:40am – 9:00am

QLD

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8:10am – 8:30am

NT

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6:40am – 7:00am

WA

Welcome Address

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10:00am – 12:00pm

NSW, VIC, TAS, ACT

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9:30am – 11:30am

SA

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9:00am – 11:00am

QLD

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8:30am – 10:30am

NT

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7:00am – 9:00am

WA

Beyond Tertiary Education: Rethinking Approaches to the Teaching and Learning of Archaeology in Australia

Convenors
Georgia Roberts, Australian National Committee for Archaeology Teaching and Learning
Melissa Marshall, Nulungu Research Institute, The University of Notre Dame Australia

Australian Archaeology in Profile: Views of Learning and Teaching

Geraldine Mate, Queensland Museum

Learning Archaeology Online: Student Perspectives on the most Effective Activities and Resources Delivered Remotely

Rebekah Kurpiel, School of Archaeology and History, La Trobe University

COVID19 and the Transition to Online Teaching for Practical Archaeology Curricula: Reflections and Lessons Learned in a Large University Degree Program

Andrew Fairbairn, School of Archaeology, the University of Queensland

Australian Archaeology Skills Passport: Reviewing a Challenging Introductory Year

Georgia Roberts, Australian National Committee for Archaeology Teaching and Learning

Skeletons in the Living Toom: Adapting Zooarchaeology Teaching to Remote Online Delivery During COVID-19 Pandemic

Sofia C. Samper Carro, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Australian National University

Sixty Years of Learning Archaeology at a Distance: An Australian Story

Wendy Beck, Department of Archaeology, University of New England

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30 minutes

Break

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12:30pm - 2:30pm

NSW, VIC, TAS, ACT

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12:00pm - 2:00pm

SA

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11:30am - 1:30pm

QLD

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11:00am - 1:00pm

NT

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9:30am - 11:30am

WA

Hard Science and Hard Tissue: Osteological Evidence for Human Behaviour and Biology

Convenor
Angeline Leece, La Trobe University

Paranthropus Robustus: The Dental Evidence. Does Variation in Size Represent Sexual Dimorphism?

Angeline Leece, La Trobe University

The Taxonomy of Paranthropus Robustus as Revealed by Fossils from Drimolen, South Africa

Jesse Martin, La Trobe University

Revisiting the Microstructure of the Homo Erectus Trinil V and Trinil III Femora

Madeleine Green, Australian National University

Trusting Tall Tiger Tales: How big was the Thylacine?

Douglass Rovinsky, Monash University

Technology or Taphonomy? A Study of the World’s Oldest Bone Tools

Rhiannon Stammers, La Trobe University

Temporal Lobe Sulcal Pattern Variation in Modern Humans and Implications for Fossil Homo

Alannah Pearson, Australian National University

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30 minutes

Break

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3:00pm - 5:00pm

NSW, VIC, TAS, ACT

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2:30pm - 4:30pm

SA

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2:00pm - 4:00pm

QLD

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1:30pm - 3:30pm

NT

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12:00pm - 2:00pm

WA

Archaeology, Colonialism, and Tourism in Africa and Australia

Convenor
Vera-Simone Schulz, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut

Tourism, Heritage and Race in Colonial Libya

Brian McLaren, University of Washington

Has Southern African Archaeology Moved on from its Colonial Past?

Shadreck Chirikure, University of Oxford

Masking Colonialism, Sanitising the Indigenous: An African Perspective on Archaeo-Heritage Tourism

Catherine Namono, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Tracing the Roots of Kenya’s Tourism: An Archaeological and Colonial Dimension

Ray Mutinda Ndivo, Mount Kenya University

Erasure of Indigenous Pasts in Great Barrier Reef Tourism

Celmara Pocock, University of Southern Queensland

The Ethics of Visibility in Kakadu National Park: Tourism, Archaeology and Colonial Debris

Tracy Ireland, University of Canberra

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30 minutes

Break

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5:30pm - 6:30pm

NSW, VIC, TAS, ACT

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5:00pm - 6:00pm

SA

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4:30pm - 5:30pm

QLD

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4:00pm - 5:00pm

NT

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2:30pm - 3:30pm

WA

General Session

 

Drowning the Dragon: Voices of Isolated Chinese Settlers Rise From Beneath the Sea

Donald Kerr, Energy Queensland

Are the Widespread Clusters of Stone Artefacts on Dune Surfaces in Southeastern Arid Australia Really Late Holocene in Age?

Amy Way, Australian Museum and the University of Sydney

New Investigations in Old Collections: Australian Hardwood Boomerangs used as Retouchers

Eva Francesca Martellotta, Griffith University

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